‘Magic box’ for climate-friendly power

Sufficient energy available at all times - not a matter of course in developing countries, especially in rural regions. STEAG has created a solution: a container-based hybrid photovoltaic system that reliably delivers electricity for up to 24 hours.

It is just six meters long, 2.45 meters wide and has a volume of 33 cubic meters. But this 20-foot shipping container has it all: Photovoltaic panels mounted on the roof can generate 4 to 8 kilowatts-peak. Supplemented by batteries, electricity can be reliably supplied up to 24 hours a day, even at a remote location.

The engineers at STEAG Energy Services (SES) developed this ‘magic box’. The STEAG subsidiary has been operating in India since the 1990s. “More than 1.3 billion people and strong economic growth are leading to an enormous demand for goods, services and raw materials,” says Joachim Rumstadt, Chairman of the Board of Management of STEAG. “The development of infrastructure, in particular access to electricity in rural areas, is a major challenge. We can support these efforts with our container solution.”

 

„This solar-based plug and play option will enable us to establish primary health care centers and refrigeration facilities which are required at remote locations.“

Dr. Ajay Mathur, Director General of TERI

The focus is on supply in the poorer rural regions of India, where villages are generally too far away from the national power grid. The STEAG containers enable climate-friendly power generation even in the remotest areas without any costs for grid connection.

The containers, manufactured in India, are delivered to their respective destinations together with the equipment to be mounted; during this journey, the container is just that –a transport container. On site, the steel box is placed on a prepared platform, earthed and the enclosed solar modules are fitted. After final assembly, around 8.5 square meters of open space are available inside the container for use in a variety of functions.

„The development of infrastructure, in particular access to electricity in rural areas, is a major challenge. We can support these efforts with our container solution.“

Joachim Rumstadt, Chairman of the Board of Management, STEAG

This innovation is marketed by STEAG together with the Indian non-profit organization The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) in India and African countries. “This solar-based plug and play option will enable us to establish primary health care centers and refrigeration facilities which are required at remote locations.” says Dr. Ajay Mathur, Director General of TERI.

The first container is in use in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. In the city of Gorakhpur, the photovoltaic system reliably supplies a project run by the non-governmental organization URJA Energy with electricity. URJA is committed to improving living conditions and promoting women’s health. In Gorakhpur, women produce hygiene articles in a small manufacturing facility. Previously, power outages had severely affected work. The STEAG container now provides a continuous power supply.